Analysis of Paint Vehicles, Japans and Varnishes Clifford Dyer Holley

ISBN: 9781230340258

Published: September 12th 2013

Paperback

46 pages


Description

Analysis of Paint Vehicles, Japans and Varnishes  by  Clifford Dyer Holley

Analysis of Paint Vehicles, Japans and Varnishes by Clifford Dyer Holley
September 12th 2013 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 46 pages | ISBN: 9781230340258 | 5.71 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...motion secure a thoroughMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...motion secure a thorough mixing of the contents of the flask. Connect with an upright condenser and distill over about 60 c.c.

of the reagent into a cylinder graduated into tenths of cubic centimeters. When the larger portion of water has passed over, the upper portion of the flask should be warmed gently with the naked flame, in order to expel the small portion of moisture that will have collected on the sides of the flask. The distillation should then be continued until the requisite amount of reagent has distilled over. The percentage of water can then be easily read off from the graduated cylinder and the contents of the distilling flask will be sufficiently liquid to insure easy removal.

With paints high in volatile oils the volume of the distillate should be increased to at least 75 c.c. A half-pint or pint varnish can heated in an oil bath is preferable to a glass distilling flask, as the danger of breakage is eliminated and the can may be discarded when the distillation is completed. Several hundred analyses made by this method on pulp leads and paste paints show that the combined water in white lead is not split off, that Prussian blue gives off practically all its water of combination and gypsum yields about 75 per cent of the water of crystallization present.

CHAPTER XII WATER EMULSIONS AND EMULSIFIERS 158. Occasionally it devolves upon the paint chemist to determine the agents used for securing and maintaining the emulsion of oil and water in paints and for preventing the hardening of paste goods, such as combination leads, etc. 159. Necessity of an emulsion. The use of water in paints has been a much discussed question. The majority of paint manufacturers have maintained that the addition of a certain amount of water is...



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